Haldol decanoate 50 mg im

Nonadherence to medications is a significant problem; in a recent study, 74 percent of patients discontinued their medication within 18 months. 16 Nonadherence often leads to relapse of symptoms. Atypical antipsychotics were initially thought to help with adherence because of their lower rate of neurologic side effects. However, meta-analyses have found that drop-out rates and relapse prevention are no better with atypical antipsychotics than with neuroleptics. 17 , 18 Meta-analyses also have found that in terms of symptom scores and drop-out rates, atypical antipsychotics are better than high dosages (., more than 12 mg per day) of haloperidol (Haldol); there was no advantage when the dosage of haloperidol was less than 12 mg per day. 17 In other words, many of the perceived benefits of atypical antipsychotics actually were a result of the excessive doses of first-generation antipsychotics that were used for comparison in randomized trials. 17 Evidence suggests that delays in initiating therapy with antipsychotics may result in a lifetime deleterious effect on psychotic episodes and social adjustment. 19 , 20 If initiation of antipsychotic therapy is delayed because of limited psychiatric resources, family physicians should consider starting medications instead.

The dose of Haldol Decanoate 50 or Haldol Decanoate 100 should be expressed in terms of its haloperidol content. The starting dose of haloperidol decanoate should be based on the patient's age, clinical history, physical condition, and response to previous antipsychotic therapy. The preferred approach to determining the minimum effective dose is to begin with lower initial doses and to adjust the dose upward as needed. For patients previously maintained on low doses of antipsychotics (. up to the equivalent of 10 mg/day oral haloperidol), it is recommended that the initial dose of haloperidol decanoate be 10–15 times the previous daily dose in oral haloperidol equivalents; limited clinical experience suggests that lower initial doses may be adequate.

Haloperidol is a typical butyrophenone type antipsychotic that exhibits high affinity dopamine D 2 receptor antagonism and slow receptor dissociation kinetics. [42] It has effects similar to the phenothiazines . [17] The drug binds preferentially to D 2 and α 1 receptors at low dose (ED 50 = and  mg/kg, respectively), and 5-HT 2 receptors at a higher dose (ED 50 =  mg/kg). Given that antagonism of D 2 receptors is more beneficial on the positive symptoms of schizophrenia and antagonism of 5-HT 2 receptors on the negative symptoms, this characteristic underlies haloperidol's greater effect on delusions, hallucinations and other manifestations of psychosis. [43] Haloperidol's negligible affinity for histamine H 1 receptors and muscarinic M 1 acetylcholine receptors yields an antipsychotic with a lower incidence of sedation, weight gain, and orthostatic hypotension though having higher rates of treatment emergent extrapyramidal symptoms .

The influence of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of haloperidol has not been evaluated. About one-third of a haloperidol dose is excreted in urine, mostly as metabolites. Less than 3% of administered haloperidol is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Haloperidol metabolites are not considered to make a significant contribution to its activity, although for the reduced metabolite of haloperidol, back-conversion to haloperidol cannot be fully ruled out. Even though impairment of renal function is not expected to affect haloperidol elimination to a clinically relevant extent, caution is advised in patients with renal impairment, and especially those with severe impairment, due to the long half-life of haloperidol and its reduced metabolite, and the possibility of accumulation (see section ).

Haldol decanoate 50 mg im

haldol decanoate 50 mg im

The influence of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of haloperidol has not been evaluated. About one-third of a haloperidol dose is excreted in urine, mostly as metabolites. Less than 3% of administered haloperidol is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Haloperidol metabolites are not considered to make a significant contribution to its activity, although for the reduced metabolite of haloperidol, back-conversion to haloperidol cannot be fully ruled out. Even though impairment of renal function is not expected to affect haloperidol elimination to a clinically relevant extent, caution is advised in patients with renal impairment, and especially those with severe impairment, due to the long half-life of haloperidol and its reduced metabolite, and the possibility of accumulation (see section ).

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